The Amazing Owen
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Jigsaw is gorgeous!! Major celebration we feel over her from the news of how well the VNS is working out for Owen! What a success! Kobe and I are snuggling here together while I read this entry. The only thing that kept him from fussing was if I read it out loud. And so at one point I glanced down at him thinking he must have drifted off to sleep he was so quiet. But nope. Kobe was completely wide eyed listening to every word. He thinks Owen is amazing too!
Comment By Kristen At 3/13/2011 10:19 PM
Love this post. That's so exciting about the service dog and hope the training goes smoothly. I love seeing all those smiling pictures of Owen. I am glad things are going so well.
Comment By Diane At 3/13/2011 10:23 PM
Wow, wow, wow! I am so happy for all of you! What wonderful news, progress, and exciting adventures for Owen! He fully deserves them all!
Comment By Vesna At 3/13/2011 11:05 PM
Great to see Owen smiling again! And really great to hear of all the progress since the surgery. He looks so grown up in that last picture with Sammy! And we can't wait to meet Jigsaw. Does she resemble our Puzzle as much as she does in the picture?
Comment By val At 3/14/2011 8:19 AM
What a happy post!! This is all such great news, you must be feeling over the moon! Hooray!
Comment By josephine At 3/14/2011 9:25 AM

Original Entry:
So Much To Tell
I hardly know where to begin - so much has been happening lately and all those things seem like they should be first in this entry.  So I'll go with tradition and do the medical stuff first and work our way through therapists and meeting another hydro family to finally sharing a picture of the wonderful dog that Owen will begin his training with this week.

Owen's progress since his VNS surgery has been nothing short of remarkable. Before the surgery, and before we started removing meds in the fall, our norm was a major seizure about every 7-9 days.  These had gotten increasingly violent - the last seizure before his surgery, while on Keppra, had almost 20 minutes of full body convulsions including both arms, legs, his head and even his eyes.  His oxygen dropped dramatically.  All of his seizures ended with an 8-10 hour postictal period where he was so deeply subconcious that he could not be awakened no matter what you did to him.

We are now averaging 14-18 days between seizures, so that's a 50% reduction.  They are also nowhere near as severe.  We have not had any convulsions since his surgery.  Even if his oxygen has dropped, we are dropping into the low 90's, not the low 70's or less and the breathing problems are not lasting anywhere near as long.  And better yet is the recovery time.  Instead of 8-10 hours of deep subconciousness - which would mess up his sleep schedule for a week - he only sleeps a normal sleep for one to two hours.  He can be roused if you try, still responds to stimuli and woke up after only 45 minutes after his last seizure because we were on a bumpy road.  Once awake he's right back to baseline crawling around and eating.  Previously it had sometimes taken a week to get back to normal because he would be shaky and uncoordinated. 

Now that the seizures have slowed way down he is back to making intellectual progress again.  He has regained all of his words and signs and has picked up a few new ones.  He now says "dog" and "all done" and signs "thank you".   You can now hand him a granola bar and he will take a bite off and put the rest down instead of cramming the whole thing in his mouth.  He has learned how to climb the inclined ladder into his sister's mini loft bed.  He will now hold a bag of fig newtons with one hand to stabilize it, and then reach in to get food out.  Previously he would just keep pushing the bag with one hand and it would keep moving further and further away from him.  He can pull objects out of the "what's inside" box because he seems to actually know that there is something in there. He just seems to be able to figure things out that have baffled him in the past.

But wait, there's more!

And finally on the VNS, there are the smiles.  Owen had started to have some serious behavior problems before his surgery.  He would swing wildly between rage and manic happiness and as time went on the rage was lasting longer and longer.  He would spend entire days (and nights!) whining and crying.  He couldn't sleep.  This is why he missed almost two months of school.  There are almost no pictures of Owen during that time where there is anything like a smile on his face.  Here are my pictures of Owen from the last two and a half months since his VNS:

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That's right - I've got a smiling boy again!!  And that would have made it worth the surgery all on its own.

His improved frame of mind has also made therapy somewhat more useful.  So here is Owen and the people that he works with at school.  I still have a few more to catch on camera, and I need to get a better picture of Ms. Amy but I didn't want to leave her out.  As an added bonus, we have even more smiles!

Ms. Ryan - Preschool Teacher

Ms. Julie - Music Therapy

Ms. Stacey - Hearing Therapy

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Ms. Angel - Occupational Therapy

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Ms. Amy - The Other Preschool Aide

And Ms. Pat - Special Educator, Advocate and the one that make Owen crack up!

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And now we are up to last week's appointments down in North Carolina. They increased the current on his VNS, and he did a stellar job during his audiology appointment.  Here is another big leap since his VNS. We have been trying for two years to get Owen to indicate in some reproducible fashion that he has heard a sound.  This skill is to be used for testing his hearing with his cochlear implant. We generally have to give him a toy, let him focus on it and then see if the sounds in the sound booth cause a change in expression or him to look up from his toy.  Not the most reliable method of testing.  Ms. Stacey now has him pointing to his ear quite often in practice testing during therapy and he did it THREE TIMES during his testing with the audiologist.  This isn't enough for a full test, but it is three times more than he has ever done before and we are hopeful that he will continue to improve.  He never seemed to "get" what we were asking for in the past and now he seems to understand it at last.

We also had the wonderful fun of meeting another hydro family while we were down this time.  We were actually supposed to meet a few new families and meet up with a few old friends too, but due to an incredible set of circumstances we only actually got to snuggle one new baby - and I did get to chat with Claire's Mom (and her Dad too on the phone, so we didn't forget you Brad!).  The other families were greatly missed and I hope that we will be able to see them soon. So may I introduce Owen's newest friend, Marlena:

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She is adorable and it was great to meet her family too.  Marlena was in for her second cord blood infusion and we peeked in just before they got started.  Owen must have liked her because I found her hospital bracelet in his stroller about an hour later - he wanted something to remember her by!

And now for the dog.  I didn't have a picture of Jigsaw to put up with the story in my last post, but his trainer was kind enough to send me one today.  Here is Jigsaw posing beautifully on the Blue Ridge Parkway:

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How could you not love that face?  We will begin our training on Wednesday with this beauty and I can't wait!  I'm sure there will be many blog entries to come about our training.

Finally I'll close with an awesome picture that Daddy got of me and the kids at the St. Patrick's Day festival this past week:

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