The Amazing Owen
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So Where Are We Now?
Today we went down to Duke to meet with Owen's neurologist.  We were lucky enough to be able to meet up with two other families that were also at Duke today for appointments and I'll get to that fun part at the end of this entry, but I also realize that with all the excitement about Jigsaw that it has been a while since I have done an update about Owen's medical stuff.

Seizures
Owen continues to have some fairly nasty seizures when he gets a virus.  Stomach viruses in particular produce the most spectacular seizures for some reason.  After watching the cycle start all over again when we started having him in school full time again, we decided that it wasn't in Owen's best interests to be in school at this time.  We pulled him out for the last two weeks of school, and we're going to play it by ear as to whether or not he needs to return in the fall. 

So, you may ask, was it worth doing the VNS given that he is still having seizures that are occassionally spectacular and are still not stable enough to take a vacation without having to bail early the way we did in early May?  Yes it was.  We've had two huge seizures in the 5 months since the VNS was implanted.  Our average was every 7 - 9 days before the VNS.  We would go through long periods where we expected a seizure with convulsions and significant oxygen drops every week. Now if he's not in school and not being exposed to viruses we often go two to three weeks without a seizure and they are generally mild. So we're still way better off with the frequency. 

Next would be the meds themselves.  Owen is incredibly sensitive to even small doses of seizure meds and starts experiencing big side effects almost immediately.  The Keppra that he was on starting last Thanksgiving, at a mere 1.5 ml twice a day, caused enough mood problems to need 100mg a day of vitamin B6 to counteract that.  The 100mg of B6 caused nausea so he needed Nexium once a day to counteract that.  And the Keppra constipated him so badly that he was in nearly constant pain from his belly even while taking Miralax at every meal.  He was absolutely miserable on Keppra.  Trileptal made his seizures worse, Depakote made him so sleepy that he couldn't get off the floor, Zonegran zipped him up and ruined his coordination.  At this point we have weaned all of his seizure meds except for a very small, non-therapeutic dose of Depakote at night to help him sleep.  The last time we tried to wean him off the meds it was a disaster, he started seizing almost non-stop and regressed horribly.  He hasn't done any such thing this time.  His background state with no meds is still much more coherent with the VNS than it was on meds before the VNS.

Finally we still continue to see that his recovery time is much faster with the VNS than it was before.

In my discussion with the neurologist today we really talked about the virus thing.  Nothing has ever made any difference with the viruses and the seizures they produce. The VNS has made the recovery time quicker, but hasn't stopped the speech regression.  He did say that there are a lot of kids for whom a virus just means a seizure no matter what they try.  That's the bad news and means that we may not be able to have him in school.  The good news is that many kids outgrow having these seizures all the time as their immune system matures and they aren't catching something every other week. 

And his buddy Jigsaw continues to stay by him during his seizures.  She had been sleeping in this position, but she always opens her eyes when she hears the bleep from my camera that says that it has focused. 

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Intellectual Development
I posted last fall about all the words and signs that he knows.  The problem is that every time he has a big seizure he loses just about all of them because his seizures occur mostly in his temporal lobe, which is where speech is processed.  He has a few basics like "ma ma", "more" and "cookie" and "up" that he seems to keep, but all the rest are just like starting over from scratch each time.  As such we never really get all that far with them. 

He does not know his colors or body parts.  The most complex command he can really handle is "stop that".  He still does not seem to have the idea of objects having a specific purpose - to him a spoon is not a tool to be used to move food into his mouth, it's a shiny object that has a neat shape.  He won't try to make a mark with a pencil or crayon, he doesn't build block towers. 

He does have some really good problem solving skills though.  If he wants something and he has to move something else to get to it, or pull a string to get it, etc he will be able to do it.  He will search for hidden objects, and has a good memory as to where his favorite items are.  Even when we were out of school for three months, the day he returned he unerringly crawled straight to his puzzles which are not visible from the main room and meant he had to go into another room.  He can take the puzzle pieces out and play with them, but he can't put them back in. 

Fine Motor Skills
He can push buttons and knows that they activate lights and sounds and such on his toys.  He can push the keys on his pianos and keyboards and loves to do so.  He does not have any rotary motion though so he cannot turn knobs.  He can turn the page in board books, though not in paper books.  He looks at board books by the hour and has a large collection.  He does not have a reliable pincer grasp and will generally use his whole fist.  He doesn't get the idea of a writing utensil and so doesn't really do more than hold it in a fist grasp with you holding his hand.

Eating
As I said above, he doesn't get the idea of a spoon or fork as having a specific purpose.  He has the coordination for it, and if you work really hard at repeating the motion of putting a spoon into the food and then into his mouth he can repeat it.  If you move the plate though, he will scoop the empty air and put it in his mouth.  He is however, capable of shoveling any type of finger food into his mouth with his hands and he is quite efficient at this.  He will pick up a piece of food, take a bite off and put it down and then repeat the process without shoving the whole thing in his mouth.  He can reach into a bag and pull out items inside while using one hand to hold and stabilize the bag.  He can drink from any cup with a straw independently.  He currently weighs 37 and a half pounds so he is putting on the pounds nicely, just ask my back and my knees and my hands from lifting him :-)

Gross Motor Skills
We have seen huge progress in this area.  He now does a proper crawl with his belly completely off the floor, and can do this at rather high rates of speed. He can get himself into a high kneel position and play with a toy.  He can pull up to stand on almost anything.  He will climb absolutely anything that he can find to climb on.  His favorite place to hang out is on top of our coffee table.  He can cruise anywhere as long as he has something to hold onto.  And, we are finally making progress in his walker!  Check him out in action here:


He is so very close to walking now. We have signed him up for twice a week physical therapy for the summer to try and kick-start his mobility and get him walking soon!

So that's really where we are now in his development.  Since getting rid of the Keppra and the tummy pain that came with it he has stopped having days/weeks at a time where he just whines all day and bites his wrists because of the pain.  He is back to his lovable self that will seek you out with a "ma ma", crawl up to you and put his arms up to be picked up.  Of course he's a busy boy now and he won't stay long before he crawls off again for another adventure, but the smiles are back. 

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And finally we are up to today's visit.  By the sheerest coincidence Owen, Kendal and Blake all had appointments at Duke today.  Owen and Kendal even had appointments with the same guy - Dr. Gallentine the neurologist, and all within an hour of each other.  Such an opportunity could not be missed to finally meet up so we all got there early to have lunch.  It was a bit hectic trying to get five kids (Owen and Kendal brought their sisters along), a dog, three Moms and a Grandma all through lunch and to the appointments, but I'm glad we made the effort.  It's always awesome to meet with other Moms, to get to see the kiddos that you've seen online in action in real life, and for the siblings to get a chance to see other kids whose lives are like theirs.  Blake and Kendal are just adorable and both loved Jigsaw.  I wish I had thought at some point to take a picture of Jigsaw on her first visit to Duke - where she was wonderfully received by hospital personnel, doctors and the kids in the waiting area - but Kendal's Grandma did get an awesome picture of the kids and their Moms by the fountain in the lobby at Duke:

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